Author Archives: Taline Voskeritchian

About Taline Voskeritchian

Writing teacher at Boston University; translator (from Arabic and Armenian); prose writer; occasional editor; incurable wanderer.

Armenian writing featured on “Asymptote”, including Number 11 of Krikor Beledian’s “Unpeopled Language”

The Fall 2022 issue of Asymptote Journal is live now, with a special section on Armenian literature in translation. The section includes Number 11 from Krikor Beledian’s 13-part “Unpeopled Language,” along with a translators’ note by Christopher Millis and me, … Continue reading

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Art Film Depicts the Landlocked Drama of Nagorno-Karabakh

My review of Nora Martirosyan’s “Should the Wind Drop” (Si le vent tombe) was published May 2, 2022 on the Markaz Review website. Should the Wind Drop / Si le vent tombe (2020), directed by Nora MartirosyanA coproduction of France/Armenia/Belgium … Continue reading

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Rhythms of a Severed Past: Chronicling a City’s Diaspora

The Spring 2022 issue of Virginia Quarterly Review features a portfolio of photographs by Ara Oshagan, and an introduction by Christopher Millis and myself. The photographs are from Oshagan’s recently published book of image and text, displaced/հատում (Kehrer Verlag, Berlin). … Continue reading

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A Cultural Milstone: The entire oeuvre of Hagop Oshagan is now on-line.

Below is the press release of the Gulbenkian Foundation, which circulated on September 10: The entire oeuvre of Hagop Oshagan, one of the giants of Western Armenian Literature, is now online and easily accessible to all, free of charge. The … Continue reading

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Arpi Dadoyan: A Tribute

Arpi Dadoyan has died.In the unwritten annals of the culture of the Armenian diaspora, Arpi holds a place which is as unique as it is legendary. No one who has been fortunate to have seen her in Varoujan Khedeshian’s 1971 … Continue reading

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Oh, Jerusalem, in the snow…

To get to Jerusalem from Amman, you would have to get to the Jordanian security checkpoint at King Husseyn (Allenby) Bridge, cross the bridge itself (a mere few minutes of a bus ride the last time I did it!), pass … Continue reading

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Glenda Jackson–then and now.

Glenda Jackson: I watched her again this weekend, this time as the very old, mentally and physically depleted Maud in the Masterpiece Theatre production of “Elizabeth is Missing.” Her voice and her face filled the screen again– that combination of … Continue reading

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Coda: after the defeat

Coda: After the defeat Over more than a quarter century, all those politicians, armchair analysts, academics, party hacks, activists, and celebrities who spoke only when the truth was self-evident and did not need the courage of one’s convictions are now … Continue reading

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Pashinyan’s “Hardtalk” Stumble: Back to the Drawing Board

None of this, though, is meant to suggest that Pashinyan or his foreign minister was a victim of anti-Armenian bias, or that “Hard Talk” is in the pocket of the Azerbaijanis. The program approaches all its guests with a Thatcher-like … Continue reading

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The fractured center of “Da 5 Bloods”

Spike Lee’s “Da 5 Bloods” is film about a neglected subject–the experiences of African Americans in the Viet Nam war. And as such it is a corrective and timely. Beyond that, the film has a beautiful surface which spans the … Continue reading

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